ssnugetI just pushed a point release of StudioShell.  It contains a few fixes related to autocomplete, but the majority of the code changes are related to being able to easily leverage the DTE drive from Nuget packages and the Package Manager console in Visual Studio.

Up until this point, you had to install the entire StudioShell environment to be able to use its features from the Package Manager console.  This was problematic because the full install for StudioShell is not straightforward or simple, and most of the install-related issues reported for the project stemmed from people trying to leverage it from the Package Manager console.

This latest release remedies this by breaking the StudioShell project into two unique distributions:

  1. StudioShell: the complete StudioShell environment;
  2. StudioShell.Provider: the StudioShell DTE PowerShell provider.

Here’s a breakdown of how the features between the two distributions differ:

Feature StudioShell StudioShell.Provider
DTE Drive

*

*

Solution Modules

*

*

Custom Scripted Menu Items

*

*

Data Panes & Visualizations

*

 
Custom Host Settings

*

 
Custom Profile Scripts

*

 
Custom Console

*

 

In a nutshell, StudioShell.Provider isolates the main gem of StudioShell automation – the PSDTE PowerShell provider.  The host-level features, such as visualizations and the custom StudioShell profile script, are only available in the full StudioShell install.

The reason I’m doing this is simple: I want people to be able to use StudioShell in their Nuget packages to manipulate Visual Studio.  I’m working on a simple demonstration package that will show off a bit of what you’ll be able to do from your Nuget packages if you add a dependcy on StudioShell.Provider and will publish it as soon as it’s ready.